Doc, I Want a Raise!

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Brush them!A recent poll conducted by Real Money magazine reveals that 71% of the respondents want a raise this year. The clients we work with will often give us two perspectives;

1) A call from a dentist wanting help with performance reviews. It’s time for raises and the staff is pressuring the dentist for a review. Or the dentist is panicked because she promised reviews six weeks ago, but has been avoiding it because it takes so much time. Or the dentist feels reviews and raises just create trouble and is tempted to just give everyone an across-the-board raise to get it over with.

2) A call from a team member wanting to know how to get her (or his) dentist to do performance reviews. She might complain that he keeps rescheduling them, and she needs some valuable feedback. She may feel she is entitled to earn more money because she believes she’s carrying a big load. Or the dentist promised a review after six months but she’s been working there ump-teen years without any feedback.

Here are some thoughts from Sandy Roth about this timely topic:

I’ve written several essays on the issue of compensation and performance evaluations. By now you know that we encourage our clients to compensate staff based on merit and work performance, not length of service or time of the year. For that reason, it is essential to establish a system of reviewing the performance of every member of the team at regular intervals. But how do you structure such an evaluation? And how can these evaluations be done without becoming a huge burden for the
dentist?

The process can be made simple if the preliminary work has been done. We can’t talk about evaluations without mentioning that a Statement of Performance Expectations must be in place for each employee. A Statement of Performance Expectations is quite different from a traditional job description.The job description was a union invention which outlined exactly what the employee was expected to do and thus guarding her from having to do anything more. This mentality makes no sense in dentistry, where each person is expected to grow and change as the needs of the client and practice change.

Whereas a job description outlines the employee’s tasks and limits the scope of her influence, a Statement of Performance Expectation widens her sphere of influence by suggesting ways she might have a greater impact on the success of the practice. When a Statement of Performance Expectations is appropriately in place for each employee, performance evaluations are a breeze.

The next step is to involve each employee in her (or his) own evaluation. The process is amazingly simple and wonderfully healthy. The employee begins by evaluating her own performance, using the Statement of Performance Expectations as a guide. Simultaneously, the dentist (and in more sophisticated teams, other team members) evaluate the team member’s performance, using the same guide. The employee, dentist and other relevant team members all participate in the Performance Review meeting, during which each of the participants contributes his or her perspective on the employee’s impact on the success of the practice. This meeting is held discussion style and everyone gets an opportunity to contribute.

At the conclusion of the meeting, new goals are set, new expectations are identified, new training and learning opportunities are planned, and supportive commitments are made to the employee. Finally, the next Performance Review meeting date is set.

The following structure outlines some of the categories of expectations which you might want to consider. Use this list as a starting point and add your own ideas. For each area, identify first the expectation then the actual level of performance or mastery.

Evaluation of Clinical Effectiveness or Administrative Accuracy/Efficiency
Clinical Acumen – Diagnostic Skills – Clinical Intervention Skills – Clinical Information Skills – Clinical Strategy Skills – Clinical Collaboration – Information Transfer – Administrative Efficiency and Accuracy – Record-keeping and Tracking

Evaluation of Client Relationship Effectiveness
Listening Skills – Questioning and Learning Skills – Other Communications Skills – Ability to focus on the patient – Sensitivity to patients and their issues – Ability to develop and advance healthy relationships – Ability to transfer information to the team – Ability to handle difficult patients – Social skills – Feedback from patients

Evaluation of Team Participation
Listening Skills – Questioning and Learning Skills – Other Communications Skills – Collaborative Skills – Conflict resolution skills – Respect for others – Finesse

Evaluation of Practice Alignment
Alignment with practice vision – Problem-solving skills – Willingness to commit to the success of others – Planning and strategizing skills – Ability to spot trends and stay aware of changes – Growth patterns/Personal commitment to learning

Please note that some evaluation points are duplicated under more than one evaluation category. It is not unusual for a team member to be extremely effective with patients and out of whack with the rest of the team. These differences are worthy of notation.

Obviously, the expectations will be different for each member of the team, depending on her (or his) role and level of responsibility, and, of course, not all team members will have clinical responsibilities. So, you must individualize the Performance Evaluation categories and items to reflect the expectations of the individual team member.

Don’t fall into the trap of believing that every team member should have the same expectations and evaluation criteria. Although they are entitled to equal respect and attention, no two team members are the same, nor will they ever be. For that reason, the Statement of Performance Expectations as well as the evaluations for two team members who occupy essentially the same position will necessarily be different in some significant ways. The important thing is to set a time for evaluations and involve everyone in the process.

If you haven’t yet created Performance Expectation Statements for your employees, it is not too late. ProSynergy’s Hiring Kit is packed with information to help you learn how to create, even remedially, great relationships with your staff.

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