Practice Perception Part II: What messages might your staff be sending?

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In the first installment of Practice Perception, I asked; Does your physical plant represent your practice mission? We looked at the elements that contribute to painting a fuller picture of what your practice is about and is often the primary way patients can assess who you are and your level of professionalism and expertise.

Of course, there are other factors that contribute to your practice image.  One of the most powerful influencers is your staff. They can be a primary reason why patients are attracted to or end up leaving your practice.

Inside the practice, you certainly would want your team to be on their best behavior and represent you in a positive light. However, you can’t assume they will behave or act appropriately without being specific about your expectations. Make sure your employee manual contains specific guidelines for things as basic as the following:

PERSONAL APPEARANCE – include specifics on what you will or will not tolerate regarding: jewelry, piercings, tattoos, hair, personal hygiene, oral health, cologne or perfume, or tobacco smoke or smell.  

CLOTHING – if you supply uniforms, this should not be an issue. If you don’t, you must be specific about what is and is not appropriate.

CHATTER – quite often, dentists complain that the staff banter gets in the way of patient care. Patients who hear staff talking amongst themselves while they sit idly waiting will feel ignored. The hard and fast rule should be that the content of staff conversations in places outside the staff break room should be focused exclusively on patient care. In addition, remind your staff there should be no bad-mouthing or negative comments to other staff members or patients at any time.

PRIVACY – and of course, any conversations relating to patient care should be private and discussed in a place where they would not risk being overheard by others.

TEXTING, CELL PHONES AND SOCIAL MEDIA – team members gripe all the time about patients who use their phones during their appointments. Imagine how patients feel when a staff member diverts their attention from patients to text or use their phone or check their Facebook. It is rude and inappropriate. Period. Patients should not see or hear a staff member’s personal phone – not even a buzz when it’s placed on silent.

You cannot stop team members from using Facebook or other social media outlets outside of the practice, but you can remind them that what they post about their job or the practice is up for scrutiny. Depending on the comment, it could present the practice in a bad light. Comments can also cross privacy boundaries.  In order to protect themselves and the practice, you should request that they refrain from commenting on anything related to the practice.

ATTITUDE – you have probably experienced your share of passive-aggressive behavior by your team. It manifests itself in ways in which you may not be aware until it is brought to your attention by another team member or a patient; being surly or short with someone, slamming doors or banging things, ignoring others, sarcasm and responding in an overly exaggerated sweetness that is “put on”. Patients pick up on these behaviors and it reflects poorly on the practice and you as their leader.

OUTSIDE THE PRACTICE:

How many times have you been in public and seen one of your patients?  Whether it’s at the grocery store, gas station, sporting event or the countless other places you might go, you are keenly aware of how you might be perceived by your patients outside the practice. Your staff?  Not so much.  

When they aren’t working, your staff are probably not thinking about patients seeing them in a less-than-flattering light. And there’s not a whole lot you can do about it. However, you can encourage them to be on their best behavior. Remind them that they can be a powerful influencer to encourage patients to stay active in their dental care by the warm greeting or response they give patients outside the practice.

Enforcing these expectations can be difficult but it is essential that your staff understand  how vitally important they are in influencing practice perception. They are a huge part of the equation.

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